The 30% Club launched as a campaign in the UK in 2010 and has since expanded to fourteen other countries/ regions. Accelerated progress has been achieved through the leadership of our Chair and CEO members. In addition to the critical recognition that better gender balance leads to better results, five factors created a replicable formula for success:

  • a measurable goal with a defined timetable
  • supportive public policy that acknowledged that the status quo was unacceptable
  • change driven by those in power
  • openness to collaborate
  • a concerted and consistent series of actions and programmes.

 

THE CASE FOR CHANGE
Women's economic participation and leadership in business is essential to drive business performance, as well as to advance corporate sustainability and increase global GDP:

Financial performance: Companies in the top quartile for gender diversity on their executive teams are 21% more likely to experience above-average profitability than companies in the fourth quartile (McKinsey, 2018)

Sustainability performance: Women’s leadership is linked to reduced greenhouse gas emissions, stronger worker relations and reduced incidence of fraud, insider trading, and other unethical practices (IFC, 2019)

Economic and social development: empowering women and girls could contribute up to US $28 trillion to global GDP by 2025 (McKinsey Global Institute, 2015)

 

View Brenda Trenowden CBE, 30% Club Global Co-Chair, talking about the UK campaign:

 

Proud to be a Friend of the OECD Forum:
 


From our Chapters


United Kingdom

27%

FTSE 350

Turkey

14.3%

BIST Star Market and Main Market

Brazil

7.3%

Novo Mercado B3

Japan

7.6%

TOPIX 100

Australia

29.5%

ASX-200

United States

23.6%

S&P 100

Hong Kong

13%

Hang Seng-50

Ireland

20.9%

ISEQ 20

Malaysia

23%

FTSE Bursa Top 100

Southern Africa

19.87%

JSE Top 40 & SOEs

Canada

23.9%

TSX Composite

East Africa

N/A%


Hot off the press


Hot off press image

What to do with the gender pay gap

Charlotte Ling, Head of Change, Celesio UK

The deadline scramble has passed, the results are (mostly) in, and the result is as plenty suspected: 8 in 10 UK companies pay men more than women, and there is significant industrial bias in median pay gap in Construction and Finance & Insurance.

Most companies dispute that their pay gap is driven by bias, and instead point to under-representation in senior roles, attributable to expert skills polarisation (pilots at Ryanair are paid more than...

Go to story