The Evolution of the Board

We hosted a seminar in London last Thursday with the Davies Committee focused on the evolution of the board. The seminar gave perspectives of FTSE 100 and FTSE 250 Chairs and SIDs, board reviewers and fund managers, and was a real checkpoint on whether we need a more radical rethink about the approach to board effectiveness.

The UK has travelled a long way towards better boards, but we need to stand back and...

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And then there were… none!

The long-awaited news that Glencore has appointed a woman, Patrice Merrin, to its board means that there are finally no all-male boards in the FTSE 100!

When the 30% Club launched in November 2010, there were 21 all-male boards in the FTSE 100; the 99 Chairs that now make up the UK 30% Club have led a remarkable pace of change over the past 3 years in getting that number down to zero. The...

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Flood of Flotations is a Vital Chance to Get Women on Board

It has been a busy start to the year for the European IPO market. If the $3.2 billion of business already priced and the $8.5 billion being marketed find investors, soon a lot of new directors will be taking their seats around the boardroom tables of newly listed companies. But how many of those seats will be filled by women?

Preparation for an IPO is one of the greatest opportunities to increase the...

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Lloyds Bank targets 40% women at all its senior management levels by 2020

The announcement by Lloyds Bank of a goal to reach 40% female representation at all levels of management by 2020 is a welcome new voluntary step by a FTSE-100 company towards better gender balance at all levels.

Last December, Sir Win Bischoff, founding chairman supporter of the 30% Club and chairman of Lloyds Bank, announced an extension of the our own objective of 30% women on FTSE-100 boards by end 2015 to encompass 30% female representation on...

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A New Milestone

We are delighted and encouraged by the latest figures released by the Professional Boards Forum, which show that the percentage of women on FTSE 100 boards has crossed the psychological 20% milestone, demonstrating that momentum continues into 2014. Since March 2013, 27% of new FTSE 100 board appointments have gone to women. The ‘gap’ to reach Lord Davies’s target of 25% seats to be held by women by 2015 is now a mere 51 female appointments, with our...

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The latest stats released by BoardWatch show that FTSE 100 companies now have 19% women directors (up from 12.5% prior to Lord Davies’ review). 31 companies in the FTSE 100 now have 25% or more women on their boards, and 13 have already hit 30%! In the FTSE 250, 41 companies have 25% or more women directors, with 19 companies having 30% or more – proportionally less than the FTSE 100 but still a positive trend. Importantly, 25% of FTSE 100 and 36% of FTSE 250 board appointments since March 1...

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Mining the Metrics of Board Diversity

There is some very interesting data in Thomson Reuters’ latest study ‘Mining the Metrics of Board Diversity’, tracking the progression of women on corporate boards around the world. The data shows that not only has the number of women on boards increased over the past five years, but that, on average, companies with mixed-gender boards had similar, or marginally better, performance when compared against a benchmark index. Companies with no...

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Creating sustainable change is a marathon not a sprint

The latest report from Cranfield International Centre for Women Leaders – the 2013 Female FTSE report – showed good progress in the rate of board appointments, but there is still work to be done, and it is important not to get complacent.

In the first six months since Cranfield’s last report (March 2012), the pace of change was extremely encouraging with 44% of new FTSE 100 board appointments going to women and 36% of...

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